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(12) Small Shriners International Masonic Fraternal Items
Item #m355
Price: $24.99 
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(12) Small Shriners International Masonic Fraternal Items
Shriners   Shriner International   A.A.O.N.M.S.   Mason   Masonic   Masonry   Freemasonry   Lodge   Fraternal   Organization   Charity   United States   America   American   Americana   Jewelry   Pin   Medal   Charm   Fob   Pendant   Emblem   Logo   Service   Advertising   Novelty   Nostalgic   History   Historic
The picture below shows a larger view of all (12) Different Small Shriners International Masonic Fraternal Items in this lot. Only three of these are dated and the years the others were all made are unknown. In this lot there are (11) various jewelry items and a carded and painted metal auto emblem. Most of the pins are enameled. (6) of the pins are identical and unopened with a fez hat. One of the pins (boxed one) is battery operated with blinking red eyes. The 9 volt battery is not included.

The three dated items include a 1979 necklace pendant charm or fob, an unopened 1980 75th anniversary bronze or brass medal, and an unopened 2002 rectangular New Hampshire pin.

All of these for one price! To judge the sizes the bronze medal measures 1-1/2'' wide. These items appear to vary from excellent to mint unopened and unused condition as pictured.

Below here, for reference, is some additional background information on the Shriners:

Shriners
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, also commonly known as Shriners and abbreviated A.A.O.N.M.S., established in 1870, is an appendant body to Freemasonry. In 2010, the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, as well as Shriners North America, changed its name to Shriners International, now covering nearly 200 temples (chapters) across North America, South America, Europe and Southeast Asia. The organization is best known for the Shriners Hospitals for Children it administers, and the red fezzes that members wear. The organization is headquartered in Tampa, Florida. Shriners International describes itself as a fraternity based on fun, fellowship and the Masonic principles of brotherly love, relief and truth. There are approximately 340,000 members from 195 temples (chapters) in the United States, Canada, Brazil, Mexico, the Republic of Panama, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, Europe and Australia. On July 6, 2011, Shriners International commissioned Emirat Shriners of Heidelberg, Germany, as its 194th temple, and took the first steps toward forming a new temple in Mindanao, Philippines. Eventually on July 3, 2012, Agila Shriners of Mindanao, Philippines was chartered as the 195th temple.

History
In 1870, there were several thousand Masons in Manhattan, many of whom lunched at the Knickerbocker Cottage at a special table on the second floor. There, the idea of a new fraternity for Masons stressing fun and fellowship was discussed. Walter M. Fleming, M.D., and William J. Florence took the idea seriously enough to act upon it. Florence, a world renowned actor, while on tour in Marseilles, was invited to a party given by an Arabian diplomat. The entertainment was something in the nature of an elaborately staged musical comedy. At its conclusion, the guests became members of a secret society. Florence took copious notes and drawings at his initial viewing and on two other occasions, once in Algiers and once in Cairo. When he returned to New York in 1870, he showed his material to Fleming. Fleming took the ideas supplied by Florence and converted them into what would become the ''Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine (A.A.O.N.M.S.)''. Fleming created the ritual, emblem and costumes. Florence and Fleming were initiated August 13, 1870, and initiated 11 other men on June 16, 1871.

The group adopted a Middle Eastern theme and soon established Temples (though the term Temple has now generally been replaced by Shrine Auditorium or Shrine Center). The first Temple established was Mecca Temple (now known as Mecca Shriners), established at the New York City Masonic Hall on September 26, 1872. Fleming was the first Potentate.

In 1875, there were only 43 Shriners in the organization. In an effort to spur membership, at the June 6, 1876 meeting of Mecca Temple, the Imperial Grand Council of the Ancient Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine for North America was created. Fleming was elected the first Imperial Potentate. After some other reworking, by 1878 there were 425 members in 13 temples in eight states, and by 1888, there were 7,210 members in 48 temples in the United States and Canada. By the Imperial Session held in Washington, D.C. in 1900, there were 55,000 members and 82 Temples. By 1938 there were about 340,000 members in the United States. That year Life published photographs of its rites for the first time. It described the Shriners as ''among secret lodges the No. 1 in prestige, wealth and show'', and stated that ''in the typical city, especially in the Middle West, the Shriners will include most of the prominent citizens''. Shriners often participate in local parades, sometimes as rather elaborate units: miniature vehicles in themes (all sports cars; all miniature 18 wheeler trucks; all fire engines, and so on), an ''Oriental Band'' dressed in cartoonish versions of Middle Eastern dress; pipe bands, drummers, motorcycle units, Drum and Bugle Corps, and even traditional brass bands.

Membership
Despite its theme, the Shrine is not connected to Islam. It is a men's fraternity rather than a religion or religious group. Its only religious requirement is indirect: all Shriners must be Masons, and petitioners to Freemasonry must profess a belief in a Supreme Being. To further minimize confusion with religion, the use of the word ''Temple'' to describe Shriners' buildings has been replaced by ''Shrine Center'', although individual local chapters are still called ''Temples''. Until 2000, before being eligible for membership in the Shrine, a person had to complete either the Scottish Rite or York Rite degrees of Masonry, but now any Master Mason can join. Shriners count among their ranks Presidents, Senators, local business leaders, professional golfers, country music stars, Astronauts and racecar drivers.

Women's auxiliaries
While there are plenty of activities for Shriners and their wives, there are two organizations tied to the Shrine that are for women only: The Ladies' Oriental Shrine and Daughters of the Nile. They both support the Shriners Hospitals and promote sociability, and membership in either organization is open to women 18 years of age and older who is related to a Shriner or Master Mason by birth, marriage, or adoption. The Ladies Oriental Shrine of North America was founded in Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1903, and Daughters of the Nile was founded in 1913 in Seattle, Washington.

Architecture
Some of the earliest Shrine Centers often chose a Moorish Revival style for their Temples. Architecturally notable Shriners Temples include the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles, New York City Center, now used as a concert hall, Newark Symphony Hall, the Landmark Theater (formerly The Mosque) in Richmond, Virginia, the Tripoli Shrine Temple in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the Helena Civic Center (Montana) (formerly the Algeria Shrine Temple), and the Fox Theatre (Atlanta, Georgia) which was jointly built between the Atlanta Shriners and William Fox.

Shriners Hospitals for Children
The Shrine's charitable arm is the Shriners Hospitals for Children, a network of twenty-two hospitals in the United States, Mexico and Canada. In June 1920, the Imperial Council Session voted to establish a ''Shriners Hospital for Crippled Children''. The goal of this hospital was to treat orthopedic injuries, diseases, and birth defects in children. After lots of research and debate, the committee chosen to determine the site of the hospital decided there should be not just one hospital but a network of hospitals spread across North America. The first hospital was opened in 1922 in Shreveport, Louisiana and by the end of the decade thirteen more hospitals were in operation. They now deal with orthopedic care, burn treatment, cleft lip and palate care and spinal cord injury rehabilitation. The rules for all of the Shriners Hospitals are simple and to the point: Any child can be admitted to the hospital if, in the opinion of the surgeons, the child can be treated and is under the age of 18. Until June 2012, all treatment offered at Shriner's Hospitals for Children was offered without any financial obligation to patients and their families. At that time, because the size of their endowment had decreased due to losses in the stock market, the Shriners started billing patient's insurance companies, but still offered free care to those that didn't have insurance. There is no requirement for religion, race, or relationship to a Shriner. Patients must be under the age of eighteen and treatable. In 2008, Shriners Hospitals had a total budget of $826 million and in 2007 they approved 39,454 new patient applications, attended to the needs of 125,125 patients.

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(12) Small Shriners International Masonic Fraternal Items


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