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Small 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition Advertising Souvenir Tray
Item #g879
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Small 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition Advertising Souvenir Tray
Louisiana Purchase   Exposition   World's Fair   St. Louis   Missouri   Advertising   Souvenir   Tray   Novelty   History   Historic   Building   Art Nouveau
The picture shows a view of this Small 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition Advertising Souvenir Tray. This small light weight tray, or tip tray, is made of very thin embossed and imprinted aluminum. Even the lightest touch could bend or indent it. It pictures the Administration building within an art nouveau frame. It has an embossed scroll border. This advertising souvenir tray is marked as follows:

ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION
ST. LOUIS, 1904.

The tray measures about 4-1/2'' x 3''. It appears to be in very good condition considering the fragile thin metal that it is made of. It has some indents as pictured Below here, for reference, is a little information on the Fair:

Louisiana Purchase Exposition
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Louisiana Purchase Exposition, informally known as the Saint Louis World's Fair, was an international exposition held in St. Louis, Missouri in 1904.

Background

In 1904, St. Louis hosted the world at a major international World's Fair. The Fair celebrated the centennial of the Louisiana Purchase (1803), one year late. It was delayed from a planned opening in 1903 to 1904, to allow for full scale participation by more states and foreign countries. The Fair opened April 30, 1904, and closed December 1, 1904. Of notable interest is that St. Louis had held an annual Saint Louis Exposition since the 1880s as agricultural, trade, and scientific exhibitions, but this event was not held in 1904, due to the World's Fair.

The Fair's 1,200 acre site, designed by George Kessler, was located at the present day grounds of Forest Park and on the campus of Washington University, and was the largest fair to date. There were over 1,500 buildings, connected by some 75 miles of roads and walkways. It was said to be impossible to give even a hurried glance at everything in less than a week. The Palace of Agriculture alone covered some 20 acres.

Exhibits were staged by 62 foreign nations, the United States government, and 43 of the then 45 U.S. states. These featured industries, cities, private organizations and corporations, theater troupes, and music schools. There were also over 50 concession type amusements found on ''The Pike''; they provided educational and scientific displays, exhibits and imaginary 'travel' to distant lands, history and local boosterism (including Louis Wollbrinck's ''Old St. Louis'') and pure entertainment. 19,694,855 individuals were in attendance at the fair.

Buildings

As with the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, all but one of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition's grand, neo Classical exhibition palaces were temporary structures, designed to last but a year or two. They were built with a material called ''staff,'' a mixture of plaster of Paris and hemp fibers, on a wood frame. As at the Chicago world's fair, buildings and statues deteriorated during the months of the Fair, and had to be patched.

The Palace of Fine Art, designed by architect Cass Gilbert, featured a grand interior sculpture court based on the Roman Baths of Caracalla. Standing at the top of Art Hill, it now serves as the home of the St. Louis Art Museum.

The Administration Building, designed by Cope & Stewardson, is now Brookings Hall, the defining landmark on the campus of Washington University. A similar building was erected at Northwest Missouri State University founded in 1905 in Maryville, Missouri. The grounds layout was also recreated in Maryville and now is designated as the official Missouri State Arboretum.

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Small 1904 Louisiana Purchase Exposition Advertising Souvenir Tray


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