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1943 United States Navy U.S.S. Indianapolis CA-35 Heavy Cruiser Linen Post Card
Item #m322
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This item is already sold1943 United States Navy U.S.S. Indianapolis CA-35 Heavy Cruiser Linen Post Card
U.S. Navy   Heavy Cruiser   U.S.S. Indianapolis   CA-35   Sailor   Veteran   Nautical   Ship   Military   World War II   WWII   Atomic Bomb   War   United States   America   American   Americana   Travel   Transportation   Post Card   Paper   Ephemera   History   Historic
The picture below shows a larger front and back view of this 1943 United States Navy U.S.S. Indianapolis CA-35 Heavy Cruiser Linen Post Card. This post card was sent from Newport, Rhode Island to a Portsmouth New Hampshire address. The Sailor sent it to his sweetheart during World War II. It is postmarked January 15, 1943. It has a colorful ship image on the front and a message written on the back. The postcard measures about 5-1/2'' x 3-3/8''. It appears to be in excellent used condition as pictured.

Below here, for reference, is some additional information about the U.S.S Indianapolis (CA-35):

U.S.S. Indianapolis (CA-35)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

History
United States
Name: Indianapolis
Namesake: City of Indianapolis, Indiana
Ordered: 13 February 1929
Awarded: 15 August 1929
Builder: New York Shipbuilding Corporation, Camden, New Jersey
Cost: $10,903,200 (contract price)
Laid down: 31 March 1930
Launched: 7 November 1931
Sponsored by: Miss Lucy Taggart
Commissioned: 15 November 1932
Identification: Hull symbol: CL-35, Hull symbol: CA-35
Code letters: NABD
Nickname: "Indy"
Honors and awards: Bronze service star, Silver service star, 10 battle stars
Fate: Torpedoed and sunk on 30 July 1945 by Japanese submarine I-58.

General characteristics (as built)
Class and type: Portland class cruiser
Displacement: 9,950 long tons (10,110 t) (standard)
Length: 610 feet 3 inches (186.00 m) loa, 584 ft (178 m) lwl
Beam: 66 feet 1 inch (20.14 m)
Draft: 17 feet 4 inches (5.28 m) (mean), 24 feet (7.3 m) (max)
Installed power: 8 White Forster boilers, 107,000 shp (80,000 kW)
Propulsion: 4 Parsons reduction steam turbines, 4 screws
Speed: 32.7 kn (37.6 mph; 60.6 km/h)
Complement: 95 officers 857 enlisted (as designed), 1,269 officers and men (wartime)
Armament: 9 - 8 inch (200 mm)/55 caliber guns (3x3), 8 - 5 inch (130 mm)/25 caliber anti-aircraft guns, 2 3 pounder 47 mm (1.9 in) saluting guns
Armor:
Belt: 3-1⁄4 - 5 inch (83 - 127 mm)
Deck: 2-1⁄2 inch (64 mm)
Barbettes: 1-1⁄2 inch (38 mm)
Turrets: 1-1⁄2 - 2 1⁄2 inch (38 - 64 mm)
Conning tower: 1-1⁄4 inch (32 mm)
Aircraft carried: 4 floatplanes
Aviation facilities:2 Amidship catapults

General characteristics (1945)
Armament: 9 - 8 inch (200 mm)/55 caliber guns (3x3), 8 - 5 inch (130 mm)/25 caliber anti-aircraft guns, 2 3 pounder 47 mm (1.9 in) saluting guns, 6 quad 40 mm (1.6 in) Bofors anti-aircraft guns, 19 single 20 mm (0.79 in) Oerlikon anti-aircraft cannons
Aircraft carried: 3 floatplanes
Aviation facilities: 1 Amidship catapults (starboard catapult removed in 1945)

The U.S.S. Indianapolis (CL/CA-35) was a Portland class heavy cruiser of the United States Navy. She was named for the city of Indianapolis, Indiana. She was the flagship of Admiral Raymond Spruance while he commanded the Fifth Fleet in battles across the Central Pacific.

Her sinking led to the greatest single loss of life at sea in the history of the U.S. Navy. On 30 July 1945, after a high speed trip to deliver parts for Little Boy, the first atomic bomb used in combat, to the United States air base at Tinian, the ship was torpedoed by the Imperial Japanese Navy submarine I-58 while on her way to the Philippines, sinking in 12 minutes. Of 1,196 crewmen aboard, approximately 300 went down with the ship. The remaining 900 faced exposure, dehydration, saltwater poisoning, and shark attacks while floating with few lifeboats and almost no food or water. The Navy learned of the sinking when survivors were spotted four days later by the crew of a PV-1 Ventura on routine patrol. Only 317 survived.

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1943 United States Navy U.S.S. Indianapolis CA-35 Heavy Cruiser Linen Post Card


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