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(2) 1943 U.S.S. Wingfield & U.S.S. Thornhill Ship Launching Pin Back Buttons
Item #d750
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This item is already sold(2) 1943 U.S.S. Wingfield & U.S.S. Thornhill Ship Launching Pin Back Buttons
U.S.S. Wingfield   U.S.S. Thornhill   United States   U.S. Navy   Ship   Destroyer   Military   Sailor   World War II   WWII   War   Americana   Historic   Advertising   Celluloid   Pin Back Button
The picture shows a front and back view of the (2) 1943 U.S.S. Wingfield & U.S.S. Thornhill Ship Launching Pin Back Buttons. These launching badges are believed to have been saved by a shipyard worker. They were found in a Staten Island, New York attic with many others dating from 1941 to 1944 when many ships were launched to do battle in World War II. They had been hidden away in that attic from the 1940s until 2008. The ships were launched from The Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock of Kearny, New Jersey.

These pinback buttons are imprinted in black on a yellow background. There are paper inserts in the backs. They are marked on the two sides as follows:

U.S.S. WINGFIELD
AND
U.S.S. THORNHILL
LAUNCHING
DECEMBER 30, 1943

THE WHITEHEAD & HOAG CO.
NEWARK, N.J.
BUTTONS, BADGES, NOVELTIES AND SIGNS

The pin back buttons each measure 1-1/2'' wide. They are in good condition with some spotting and surface rusting on the back as pictured.

Below here, for reference, is some information on the U.S.S. Wingfield and U.S.S. Thornhill:

U.S.S. Wingfield (DE-194)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Career

Laid down: 7 October 1943
Launched: 30 December 1943
Commissioned: 28 January 1944
Decommissioned: 26 August 1947
Struck: 20 October 1950
Fate: Transferred to France, 15 September 1950

General characteristics

Class: Cannon class destroyer escort
Type: DET (diesel electric tandem motor drive, long hull)
Displacement: 1,240 tons (std) 1,620 tons (full)
Dimensions: 306' (oa), 300' (wl) x 36' 10" x 11' 8" (max)
Range: 10,800 nm at 12 knots
Speed: 21 knots
Complement: 15 officers, 201 enlisted
Armament: 3 x 3''/50 Mk22 (1x3), 1 twin 40mm Mk1 AA, 8 x 20mm Mk 4 AA, 3 x 21'' Mk15 TT (3x1), 1 Hedgehog Projector Mk10 (144 rounds), 8 Mk6 depth charge projectors, 2 Mk9 depth charge tracks.


Propulsion: 4 GM Mod. 16-278A diesel engines with electric drive, 6000 shp, 2 screws.

U.S.S. Wingfield (DE-194) was a Cannon class destroyer escort built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean and provided escort service against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys. Wingfield was named in honor of John Davis Wingfield, who won the Navy Cross but lost his life in 1942 in the Coral Sea. The ship was laid down on 7 October 1943 at Kearny, New Jersey, by the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Corporation; launched on 30 December 1943; sponsored by Mrs. E. E. Wingfield; and commissioned on 28 January 1944, Lt. Comdr. H. E. Purdy in command.

World War II Atlantic Ocean operations
Following shakedown training in Bermuda and refresher training in Casco Bay, Maine, Wingfield reported for duty on 1 April 1944 as a training ship for the Destroyer Escort School. She began her primary work on 8 April when she began an escort voyage for a coastal convoy to New York. The U.S.S. Wingfield, in company with the U.S.S. Thornhill(DE-195), cleared Norfolk, Virginia, on the 16th for a submarine hunt south of Cape Hatteras, then to Great Sound, Bermuda. She returned to Norfolk on 1 May and became the flagship of Destroyer Escort Division 55.

All ships of this division entered New York harbor on 9 May 1944 and returned to Norfolk the next day with the New York section of Convoy UGS-42, bound for North Africa. This 108 ship convoy sortied from Hampton Roads on 13 May and reached Bizerte, Tunisia, on 1 June. She returned to New York with another convoy on 29 June and got underway from that port on 10 July for refresher training in Casco Bay. Between 24 July and 7 September, she made a second voyage, escorting UGS-49, from Norfolk to Bizerte and back to New York.

After completing voyage repairs in the New York Navy Yard and battle practices at Casco Bay, Wingfield cleared New York on 14 October 1944 for the first of five escort voyages to ports in Great Britain. She returned to New York from Plymouth, England, on 9 November. Wingfield again sailed from New York to Plymouth and back between 2 December 1944 and 1 January 1945. She made a run from New York to Roath Docks, Cardiff, Wales, and back between 18 January and 18 February; one from Boston, Massachusetts to Roath Docks, Cardiff, Wales, and back to New York between 8 March and 4 April; and one from New York to Southampton, England, and back between 24 April and 23 May 1945. She was at Southampton on ''V-E Day'' and enjoyed the honor of escorting the first peacetime convoy from England to New York. Despite the presence of aggressive ''wolf packs'' of U-boats during the later days of the war, not one ship escorted by Wingfield was damaged by an enemy submarine. During her service in the North Atlantic, this ship rendered medical aid to merchant vessels in convoy on more than 100 occasions.

Transfer to the Pacific Theatre
After upkeep in the New York Navy Yard and refresher training at Guantanamo Bay, Wingfield transited the Panama Canal on 1 July 1945 with units of Escort Division 55. She stopped briefly at San Diego, California, and arrived at Pearl Harbor on 20 July and underwent a five day upkeep period. The ship then operated in the Hawaiian area training student officers in underway gunnery practices and antisubmarine exercises. On 8 August 1945, Wingfield cleared Pearl Harbor with all other units of Escort Division 55 escorting S.S. Empress of Australia to the safety of the Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands. While at sea on 15 August, the ships received word that Japan had capitulated. The ocean escorts entered Eniwetok lagoon the next day. Between 24 and 29 August, Wingfield joined in a vain search for a reported life raft.

End of War Activity
On 4 September, Wotje and Maloelap expressed their willingness to surrender. On that day, the U.S.S. Wingfield proceeded with the U.S.S. Baron (DE-166) for the Jaluit Atoll to accept the surrender of the Japanese garrison, then proceeded to Maloelap for the surrender of that atoll. Wotje was formally surrendered on board Baron by Rear Admiral Nobukazu Yoshimi, and Maloelap by Rear Admiral Shochi Tamada on board Wingfield. On 6 September, Wingfield became the first American warship to enter the Maloelap Atoll. She proceeded to Toroa Anchorage where Admiral Tamada, Imperial Japanese Navy (I.J.N.), Lt. Inabi, I.J.N., and Lt. Aoki, I.J.N., arrived on board, signed the surrender agreement, and departed the ship. The entire event was completed in 25 minutes. All hands were at battle stations in dress whites for the ceremony.

A brief and simple flag raising ceremony was held on 10 September. Captain H. B. Grow, USNR, in the presence of the Japanese garrison and a landing force from Wingfield, read the proclamation; copies written in Japanese were distributed to the Japanese garrison. The United States flag was raised over the atoll and colors were sounded, while a detachment of officers, sailors, and marines stood at attention with the Japanese, who also joined in saluting the flag. Wingfield fired a 21 gun salute as the colors reached the top of the flagpole.

During the next six days, Wingfield supervised Japanese compliance with the terms of surrender. On 16 September, the ship got underway to a new anchorage off Engenben Island to allow minesweepers to clear Toroa Anchorage. Meanwhile, she continued to receive Japanese arms on board; and, on 26 September, she transported 56 ill Japanese to Mille for evacuation to Japan. The next day, Toroa Anchorage and Enijun Channel were declared free of mines; and Wingfield returned to supervise the garrison until 1 November when a Japanese evacuation ship came to anchor and evacuated 163 Japanese Army personnel of the Maloelap garrison.

Wingfield got underway on 2 November, touching at Majuro Atoll to unload medical equipment, and thence proceeded to Kwajalein lagoon where she embarked Navy veterans for transportation to the United States. She put to sea from Kwajalein Atoll on 7 December 1945 and steamed by way of Pearl Harbor and San Diego, California, to arrive in the Boston Naval Shipyard on 25 January 1946.

Post War Deactivation and Decommissioning
After repairs and dock trials, she stood out of Boston harbor on 17 February and reported to Green Cove Springs, Florida, on 20 February 1946 for inactivation. She was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 15 June 1946 and assigned to the Florida Group of the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Wingfield was transferred to the Government of France on 10 September 1950, under terms of the Military Assistance Program. She served the French Navy as Sakalave (F720). She was scrapped in 1960.


*************************************


U.S.S. Thornhill (DE-195)
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Career

Laid down: 7 October 1943
Launched: 30 December 1943
Commissioned: 1 February 1944
Decommissioned: 17 June 1947
Struck: 26 March 1951
Fate: Transferred to Italy, 10 January 1951

General characteristics

Class: Cannon class destroyer escort
Type: DET (diesel electric tandem motor drive, long hull)
Displacement: 1,240 tons (std) 1,620 tons (full)
Dimensions: 306' (oa), 300' (wl) x 36' 10'' x 11' 8'' (max)
Range: 10,800 nm at 12 knots
Speed: 21 knots
Complement: 15 officers, 201 enlisted
Armament: 3 x 3''/50 Mk22 (1x3), 1 twin 40mm Mk1 AA, 8 x 20mm Mk 4 AA, 3 x 21'' Mk15 TT (3x1), 1 Hedgehog Projector Mk10 (144 rounds), 8 Mk6 depth charge projectors, 2 Mk9 depth charge tracks.
Propulsion: 4 GM Mod. 16-278A diesel engines with electric drive, 6000 shp, 2 screws.

U.S.S. Thornhill (DE-195) was a Cannon class destroyer escort built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. She served in the Atlantic Ocean and Pacific Ocean and provided escort service against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys. She was named after Leonard W. Thornhill, who participated in the Battle of Coral Sea and was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. Thornhill (DE-195) was laid down on 7 October 1943 at Kearny, New Jersey, by the Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock Co.; launched on 30 December 1943; sponsored by Mrs. J. E. Thornhill, the mother of Lt. (jg.) Thornhill; and commissioned on 1 February 1944, Lt. John B. Shumway, U.S.N.R., in command.

World War II North Atlantic operations
The destroyer escort got underway on 18 February, held shakedown training out of Bermuda, and returned to New York exactly one month later. Thornhill served as a training ship at Norfolk, Virginia, during April. In May, she returned to New York to escort a part of Convoy UGS-42 to Norfolk. The 108 ship convoy sortied from Hampton Roads on 13 May, bound for North Africa. Thornhill arrived at Bizerte on 1 June and returned to New York on the 29th with a westbound convoy. Late in July, the destroyer escort screened another convoy to North Africa and returned to New York on 7 September 1944.

Transfer to the Pacific Theatre of Operations
During the next eight months, the U.S.S. Thornhill made four more escort voyages to England and France. On 9 June 1945, she and the other ships of Escort Division (CortDiv) 55 got underway for Guantanamo Bay and proceeded thence through the Panama Canal to the west coast of the United States. The division arrived at San Diego, California, on 9 July. CortDiv 55 stood out to sea five days later and arrived at Pearl Harbor on the 19th to join the Destroyer Force, Pacific Fleet.

End of War activities
Thornhill and her division departed with S.S. Empress of Australia on 8 August, bound for the Marshalls, and reached Eniwetok the day after hostilities with Japan ceased. She remained in the Marshalls until 7 December when she and the U.S.S.Wingfield(DE-194) headed back toward Hawaii. The two ships arrived at Pearl Harbor on 13 December 1945, and Thornhill served as a weather patrol ship there during January 1946. The destroyer escort sailed for home on 2 February and, after calling at San Diego, arrived at the Boston Navy Yard on 7 March.

Post-War decommissioning
The next week she got underway for Green Cove Springs, Florida, to be inactivated. She was decommissioned on 17 June 1946 and assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Thornhill was transferred to Italy under the Military Assistance Program on 10 January 1951 and was struck from the Navy List on 26 March that same year. She served the Italian Navy as Aldebaran (F-590) until she was stricken and broken up in 1976.

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(2) 1943 U.S.S. Wingfield & U.S.S. Thornhill Ship Launching Pin Back Buttons


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